Tuesday, 4 April 2017

Commentary on: Models of partnership within family-centred care in the acute paediatric setting

Commentary on Dennis, C., Baxter, P., Ploeg, J. & Blatz, S. 2017. Models of partnership within family-centred care in the acute paediatric setting: a discussion paper. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 73, 361-374.


Denise A. Sackinger, MN, RN, CPNP-PC, CPN
University of Washington


In the discussion paper “Models of Partnership Within Family-Centred Care in the Acute Pediatric Setting,” Dennis et al. (2017) present a cogent discussion of partnership models within the acute pediatric setting. The authors used a self-developed appraisal tool to evaluate eight partnership models originating from Western and developed countries. The tool evaluated each of the models on defining characteristics or dimensions, major conceptual propositions or relationships and context or role of environment. The category of defining characteristics evaluated the extent to which the major concepts were clearly defined in the model (semantic clarity).

It is discouraging that in six of the eight models reviewed, the concept of “partnership” was not explicitly defined. Family Centered Care is the core of pediatric nursing. Partnership is a foundational concept of Family Centered Care (Institute for Patient- and Family-Centered Care). Practice models are symbolic representations of knowledge (Chinn and Kramer, 2015). For models to be translated into practice, the concepts must be clearly defined (Meleis, 2012). As such, a partnership model which does not plainly explicate the primary concept upon which it is focused lacks semantic clarity. Lack of semantic clarity, thus concept clarity, leaves the model open to individual interpretation rather than being a unifying model of nursing care delivery. As nursing scientists, we must be clear and consistent in our conceptual definitions to provide the building blocks for model development to allow for model testing across various contexts. My hope is that we are training and developing a generation of nursing scholars who strive to understand and clarify the abstract concepts we accept as a normal part of our profession. As abstract concepts are clarified, practice models can be hypothesized and tested in an effort to provide the best care to patients and families.

I commend Dennis et al. (2017) for providing us with a framework to evaluate models of care. This framework is helpful for critically analyzing conceptual models of care. This framework can help us to identify critical aspects of conceptual models that need refinement.



Denise A. Sackinger, MN, RN, CPNP-PC, CPN
Doctoral Student, School of Nursing
University of Washington
Seattle, Washington
esacki@uw.edu


References

CHINN, P. L. & KRAMER, M. K. 2015. Knowledge Development in Nursing:  Theory and Process (9th Ed), St. Louis, MO, Elsevier.
DENNIS, C., BAXTER, P., PLOEG, J. & BLATZ, S. 2017. Models of partnership within family-centred care in the acutepaediatric setting: a discussion paper. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 73, 361-374.
INSTITUTE FOR PATIENT- AND FAMILY-CENTERED CARE. Patient- and Family-Centered Care [Online]. Available: http://www.ipfcc.org/about/pfcc.html [Accessed].

MELEIS, A. I. 2012. Theroretical Nursing:  Development & Progress (5th ed), Philadelphia, PA, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.


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