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Wednesday, 28 June 2017

Fatigue leads to nursing absence

Roger Watson, Editor-in-Chief

Fatigue and the work involved in nursing are closely related, but does fatigue lead to adverse outcomes for nurses? An article from the USA by Sagherian et al. (2017) titled: 'Acute fatigue predicts sickness absence in the workplace: A 1-year retrospective cohort study in pediatric nurses' and published in JAN came from a study that aimed to: 'examine the relationship between fatigue and sickness absence in nurses from a paediatric hospital over 12 months of follow-up. A secondary aim was to identify other work and personal factors that predict sickness absence.'

Forty children's nurses were involved and adminstered a measure of fatigue. Then they were followed up to check on their work patterns. The study showed that the extent of fatigue at the start of the study could predict sickness absence from work; nurses who were more fatigued were more likely to experience sickness absence. In conclusion, the authors say: 'Nursing management can monitor nurse fatigue and unit workloads to decrease this unfavourable outcome and consequently maintain safe practice environments.'

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Reference

Sagherian, K., Unick, G. J., Zhu, S., Derickson, D., Hinds, P. S. and Geiger-Brown, J. (2017), Acute fatigue predicts sickness absence in the workplace: A 1-year retrospective cohort study in pediatric nurses. J Adv Nurs. doi:10.1111/jan.13357

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